Here’s the text of an editorial that appeared yesterday in the Laconia (NH) Citizen suggesting that John Edwards should leave the campaign now. Just what I was thinking!

The big question is: who would Edwards’ supporters embrace as their new candidate? All signs point to Obama, especially given Edwards’ far left — if not insincere — rhetoric.

Logic suggests it’s time for John Edwards to set aside his aspirations to become president and seek a job for which he is better qualified.

Edwards was humiliated in the Nevada caucuses Saturday, attracting only 4 percent of the vote.

Edwards was jubilant when he finished second in the first test of the candidates in Iowa, but it was euphoria soon lost. He ended far behind Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in New Hampshire, sliding to attract only 17 percent of the Democrats and the unenrolled in the record turnout of Granite State voters.

It’s time for Edwards to get out, just as U.S. Rep. Douglas Hunter did Saturday following a 2 percent share of the vote in Nevada’s Republican caucuses. He received only 1 percent of the vote in South Carolina on Saturday (Democrats in South Carolina vote next Saturday).

After his battering at the polls Saturday, Edwards exhibited a touch of reality, saying, “I got my butt kicked,” adding “I hope what happens in (Las) Vegas stays in Vegas.” It won’t. Polls show him running third — behind Clinton and Obama in his birth state.

But Edwards remains committed.

A former U.S. senator from North Carolina, a candidate for the Democratic nomination and John Kerry’s running mate four years ago, Edwards knows 2008 is his last reach for America’s most coveted political prize. He also knows in himself, he has come up short — way short.

Edwards tilts so far to the left it’s a wonder he doesn’t tip over. It’s been more evident in this campaign than previous ones. His has been liberal rhetoric like that right out of the early 1920s.

John Edwards’ seeming or pretended escape from reality notwithstanding, the contest for the Democratic nomination for president has come down to one between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

Now, it’s what remains of the early primaries and caucuses and then on to Feb. 5 and Super-Duper Tuesday.

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